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DiMassimo Goldstein blog

Welcome to our blog! Each week, our inspiring action content creators work hard to update this page with the latest and greatest in the world of DiGo.

Is Your Phone Ruining Your Love Life?

Amanda Ingram feels the force. It’s her smart phone beckoning with messages. The only way she can keep in touch with her friends is through Facebook, she explains.“I don’t think it’s affecting my marriage … yet … but there are times that I feel like I have to check my texts when someone sends one,” she wrote, you know, in an e-mail. With society falling further under the spell of iPads, BlackBerries and other digital devices, two New York guys have decided it’s time to put them down and back away a little, if only for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day. Eric Yaverbaum and Mark DiMassimo, who have made a career of using digital devices, are urging people to go “Offlining,” pledging to release their grip on their phones and other digital devices for 10 dinners. To read more click here.

 

DIGO Brands The Huffington Post


by Ronit Herzfeld
The Huffington Post
February 10th, 2011

Last week my friend “Julie” and I finally went out to dinner. I had not seen her for a couple of months and we were particularly excited to have a chance to spend some quality time together. No sooner did we sit down at our table than out came her Blackberry. I felt a twinge in my chest, but held my tongue. A few minutes later, I was sharing some exciting news with her and heard that irritating text sound go off. She immediately reached out to check the message and began to respond. I suddenly felt invisible; it was as if I didn’t exist. When she finished, I asked her if there was an emergency or something critical that she needed to attend to. She said yes but gave me no further details. A few minutes later her text went off and she responded again. At that point I requested that — unless there was a life or death issue, I’d appreciate it if she turned her phone off. I could see how hard it was for her to let it go. It was clear to me that there was no emergency, and that my otherwise very sensitive and caring friend was at the mercy of this little gadget. We are all aware of how helpful, expedient and efficient our various technological devices can be. But what is not so clear is how they may be affecting our minds, our attitudes, and our relationships.

To read the full article click here.

 

DIGO Brands Workingmother.com

Workingmother.com
February 7th, 2011

Gift of an Unplugged Valentine’s Day

The gift of intimate time with your loved one (minus the Blackberry, iPhone, iPad, laptop etc.) may be the best gift you can give this Valentine’s Day. The team at Offlining.com suggests that you take a pledge to have several offline dates by Valentine’s Day and is offering a box of chocolates ($24.99, Offlininginc.com) hand-cut to cradle your Offlined phone or mobile device.

Unplug and reconnect with your loved one to have one of the most memorable Valentine’s Days in years. Read more here.

 

DIGO Brands Your Love Life

DIGO Brands not only helps to build brands we also make things! Ready to show a special someone that they have your attention? This Valentine’s Day, give more than your heart. Give them a box of chocolates, hand-cut to cradle your Offlined phone or mobile device. Each box comes with a certificate of our Offlining pledge. Only available until February 10th. Supplies are limited.

 

DIGO Brands the NFL

by Alan Schwarz
The New York Times
January 21st 2011

A mother worried “about my son playing football.” Two children colliding helmet-to-helmet — with superimposed crashing sounds and force lines rippling from their heads — drove home her fears.

Unveiled by Toyota in November, the television commercial highlighted the carmaker’s decision to share crash research with scientists studying football concussions, and was an explicit reminder of football’s recent controversies regarding concussions.

So explicit, it turns out, that the N.F.L demanded that Toyota alter the 30 second commercial, and Toyota promptly did. Now, the commercial — which originally ran last November but is now running in its edited form — has the mother worrying instead “about my son playing sports.” The helmet collision has been removed. A spokeswoman for Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Zoe Ziegler, said in an interview that the changes were made at the N.F.L.’s insistence. If Toyota did not change the ad, she said, the league had threatened to curtail or end the carmaker’s ability to advertise during games.

Brian McCarthy, a spokesman for the N.F.L., said: “We felt it was unfair to single out a particular sport. Concussions aren’t just a football issue.”The N.F.L. is correct that concussions are an issue in other sports. According to researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, high school football players report about 100,000 concussions per year. The second through ninth-ranked sports combined reach 110,000.

The demand was evidence of the N.F.L.’s delicate dance regarding head injuries as well as its power to shape its public image. The league has responded to well-publicized links between football and brain damage by producing a public service announcement about concussions, fining players for helmet-to-helmet hits and pushing for changes to state laws covering youth sports. At the same time, its business depends on people watching the sport and approving of their children playing it. Toyota is not an official sponsor of the N.F.L., but it advertises with individual teams and buys commercial time on network game broadcasts.

Advertising executives described the N.F.L.’s action, reported by Reuters as extraordinarily unusual. The ad was produced and subsequently edited by the Saatchi & Saatchi agency. “It’s not unheard for a spot to be changed after launch, but it’s usually after a portion of the public takes offense to something in it,” said Mark DiMassimo, chief creative officer for DIGO, a New York-based advertising agency. To read more click here.