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Category : Thinking

The Story Behind That Inspiring Mural Video

You’ve seen it on our T-shirts. You’ve seen it on our Twitter. Chances are you’ve probably read it about a dozen or so times here on our blog:

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We say this so often because we truly believe in it. It’s something that we strive for each and everyday. How can we inspire action in ourselves? In each other? With our clients and throughout the world? Asking these questions can only have a positive impact.

Inspiring Action is about helping people lead better lives. It’s about forming more and more empowering habits. It’s a term we use for business, but it can be applied to almost anything in life.

As an agency, we help influence consumer habits. And when we leave the office, that influence may change but it certainly doesn’t stop. We still have influence on our family, friends and peers. We have influence at the dinner table. We have influence when we’re on vacation at the beach. It’s a tremendous responsibility.

Inspiring Action is all about taking that responsibility and using it to inspire better decisions, and then watching those decisions come to fruition. It’s about realizing that you have the power to impact others’ lives and then choosing to do so in a positive manner.

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So when it came time to change the mural on our office chalkboard, the one that stands tall at the core of our workspace, it was a no-brainer. We’re so immersed in this Inspiring Action persona and so eager to share it with the world that we wanted it stamped front and center for all visitors to see.

We tapped Q Choi, our brilliant (note the emphasis on brilliant) senior motion graphic designer to put this inspiration into action. And so, for three long days Q worked hard at the center of our office, putting his famed attention to detail on display for all who passed by. Seventy-two hours later, the mural had sprung to life.

“As a Motion Graphic Designer, almost all of my work is done on a keyboard, monitor or tablet, but I still love to work with my hands.” (You can view Q’s work on his website here)

“I studied our theme and drew the initial sketch in a small notebook. I’m really happy with how it turned out”

Inspiring Action from Q on Vimeo.

It’s now the first thing you see once you’ve passed our lobby. Whether you’re going to the printer or leaving a meeting, it’s right there, grand and bold, reminding us all why we chose to work here.

And that’s to Inspire Action.

 

OVER-COLLABORATE

Especially at the beginning of relationships, while you are earning the trust and the admiration that will smooth the inevitable bumps down the road. While you are figuring everything out, and laying the groundwork for success. Get on more planes. Provide more options. Ask more questions. See the factory, meet the workers, go to the research, talk to the sales force, get a demonstration, sample the product, talk to a board member, brainstorm with the client. Over communicate. Over collaborate. Over deliver. Time and energy invested in relationships pays us back in better work, business and results. Oh, yeah, and better relationships too.

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At DiMassimo Goldstein, we put our values in a document we call “The DIGO Standard.” It doesn’t just hang on the walls and sit on our desks and desktops. We use it every day. People who visit often ask for a copy. Here’s yours, and you didn’t even have to ask.

 

Inspiring Action Brand Of The Week: Shinola

Shinola is our fifth Inspiring Action Brand of the Week. Past winners have been Bonobos, Everlane, Casper and ThePointsGuy.

Jeep. Budweiser. Levis. John Deere. Shinola.

Shinola?

Yes, Shinola. The next great American brand.

The Detroit-based luxury lifestyle brand, founded five years ago, has positioned itself as the general of an army of entrepreneurs and artists all trying to march the Motor City back to its former glory.

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Jobs.

Sure, Shinola handcrafts beautiful watches, bicycles, and leather bags, but its greatest creation is undoubtedly the jobs that come with them. The fact that it’s in Detroit, a city known just as much for its storied manufacturing past as the decades of decay that followed, really helps tie the bow on a beautifully packaged brand backstory. Not unbeknownst to founder Tom Kartsotis, the carefully selected location of their headquarters and factory have successfully added to the “Americana” lore that circulates the brand.

Shinola understands the importance of origin. Dissimilar to nearly all of its competitors, Shinola’s products are pre-dominantly manufactured in America (a small minority of the components are sourced overseas). The product of that decision has been hundreds of jobs, many of them to former auto workers who were previously unemployed.

In a recent New York Times article, Kartsotis was quoted saying “We’re not a watch company. This company really started as a job creation vehicle.” That mission has proven successful, and with big plans on the horizon for 2016, it seems as if that vehicle is only picking up speed.

Shinola knows what their devotees love about themselves, which is one of our Ten Signs of an Inspiring Action Company. Americans are patriotic. It’s in our wiring. Whether it’s watching July 4th fireworks, or suddenly becoming a huge soccer fan when the United States is in the World Cup, we love to root for the home team. Shinola represents that team, and they aren’t shy about it, either. Their tagline proudly states “Where American Is Made.”

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Massive in size, Shinola’s first factory is a far cry from the decrepit factories of yesteryear. Nestled inside the renowned Argonaut building, the factory boasts 30,000 renovated square feet of clean, state-of-the-art equipment. The building is a former laboratory for General Motors.

It’s not just the work space that gives the factory its world-class reputation. Shinola brought in the best Swiss watch builders in the world to train their people, and absorbed the cost. Additionally, Shinola pays hourly workers at least $3 more than the $8.50 minimum wage, a figure that is unrivaled by the majority of its competitors.

So go home and throw on whatever red, white and blue you have and head to your closest Shinola. Uncle Sam will be proud.

Feeling inspired? Want to learn more about Shinola? We’ve got you covered. Check out our full length case study here.

-James Nieman, Integrated Marketing Manager

 

Take the Word “Brief” Seriously

Let’s not ever make each other guess which part of a brief is the important part. Let’s just include the important pat. Let’s make sure our briefs are simple, compelling and crystal clear. Nothing in an agency is more sacred.

Make the creative teams and our clients partners in the brief. 

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At DiMassimo Goldstein, we put our values in a document we call “The DIGO Standard.” It doesn’t just hang on the walls and sit on our desks and desktops. We use it every day. People who visit often ask for a copy. Here’s yours, and you didn’t even have to ask.

 

That’s A Wrap: Recapping Season 1 of the Inspiring Action Podcast

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Last June we made the decision to jump head first into the world of podcasting. We asked you all to join us on this journey so we can inspire each other and learn what it takes to become an inspiring action leader. With little to no experience, we recorded our first interview with Public Relations legend and long time friend Eric Yaverbaum (which is a must listen for anyone who wants to be a world-class marketer).

8 months and 12 inspiring interviews later and we’re finally ready to wrap up the first season of the “Inspiring Action Podcast”. We want to thank all of our guests for being so generous and taking their time out to join the show. We’d also like to thank our inspiring action tribe of listeners for continuing to tune-in each episode. We have plenty of upgrades and even more incredible guests in store for Season 2, and we can’t wait to share them with you. If you happen to have missed any of the previous episodes, we’ve listed them all below:

Eric Yaverbaum – President, Ericho Communications

Anthony Butler – Founder & Creative Director, Can-Do Ideas

Ty Montague – Founder & CEO, Co:Collective

Ty Shay – CMO, LifeLock

Leslie Dukker Doty – CMO, President of Reader’s Digest Consumer Services, Inc.

Steve Harrison– World’s Most Cannes Lions Winning Creative and Author of a Book on Ad Legend Howard Gossage

Paul Butler – Senior Vice President of Global Programs, Rare

Mark Taylor – Master Chair & CEO Coach, Vistage NYC

Mark S. A. Smith– Marketing & Sales Guru

Sir John Hargrave – CEO, Media Shower

Ben Rothfeld – Founder, Plannerben Anecdata

Alec Brownstein – Creative Director, Dollar Shave Club

 

We’re Here To Make Things Grow

Movements. Ideas. Products. Brands. Companies. 

If we can’t get excited about growing them, we shouldn’t be working on them. The work we do has a purpose and fits into a larger whole. By maintaining that perspective, we make success more difficult. But in facing the extra difficulty, we earn our integrity, self-respect and market value.

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At DiMassimo Goldstein, we put our values in a document we call “The DIGO Standard.” It doesn’t just hang on the walls and sit on our desks and desktops. We use it every day. People who visit often ask for a copy. Here’s yours, and you didn’t even have to ask.

 

Inspiring Action Brand Of The Week: Everlane

Have you ever wondered where your clothes come from?

Sure you have.  Maybe you’ve noticed, even examined the tags. Possibly uttered a small sigh of relief when you saw that your shirt had been made in America; dismissed any gut-wrenching thoughts when you saw it had been manufactured overseas.

But what do you know about your clothes beyond that?

Know your factories. Know your costs. Always ask why.

This is the mantra of the newly established clothing manufacturer Everlane, whose mission is to sell high-quality clothing, honestly. They believe every product has a story, and they want to tell it in the most radically transparent way possible.

The idea of radical transparency is demonstrated in their “true cost” for each item – a sum of pricing for materials, hardware, labor, duties and transport. The cost is then doubled (versus marked up 8x, as in traditional retail) for the Everlane price.  Not to mention, they give you extra information on the fit, how the style originated and even facts about the factory it was created in. It won’t be the cheapest item you have ever bought, but not the most expensive either.

Now you might be thinking: wait a minute – what secrets are all the other retailers hiding?

Just by offering all of this information to their consumers, Everlane makes people realize what they don’t know about their clothing and its production process. The current world of retail is tainted with skepticism and distrust because of what is hidden. Exposing the truth in retail production has not only challenged the existing status quo, but it has upped the ante for every other retailer out there.

Before searching ravenously for the nearest location, you might be interested to know that no brick-and-mortar Everlane stores exist. They are online only, to reduce costs even more for their customers. Don’t worry, their website is better than a store – and if you live in New York or San Francisco, they will deliver your clothes to your location, free of cost.

Recently predicted to be “the next J-Crew,” Everlane will be even less of a secret in 2016.

And hey, next time you’re shopping for clothes, do yourself a favor: know your factories. Know your costs. Always ask why.

To see the full case on Everlane, click HERE.

-Ali Chastain, Junior Behavioral Strategist

 

Deeds, Not Words

Today’s Google Doodle says it all. Alice Paul, a leader in the Suffragette movement of the 1910’s, was born today in 1885. The Suffragette movement can teach us a lot about Inspiring Action. People had been talking about a woman’s right to vote for decades. But these brave women knew that talking was not getting them anywhere. So they took action.

They did all the conventional actions that protests are known for. They marched. They organized. It got them some press. But it also got them ridiculed. Indeed, the name “Suffragettes” was first used in a derogatory way by a journalist, adding “ette” to the word suffrage to feminize the idea of freedom and thereby make it oh so cute. “Look at these adorable little women pretending to want to choose their leaders! Bless their pretty little heads!” But instead of fighting against that ridicule, they embraced it. They even hardened the G and began pronouncing it “suffraGETs” implying that they intended to GET everything they were asking for.

 In 1909, Alice Paul and Amelia Brown took a brave action that they knew would land them in jail. They disguised themselves as cleaners at a banquet for English Prime Minister Asquith and other cabinet ministers. When Asquith stood up to speak, Paul and Brown threw their shoes and broke stained glass windows, screaming “Votes for women!” They were arrested and put in jail, where they began a hunger strike. Their jailers force-fed them with tubes.

The movement began selling a board game based on this story. It was called “Pank-A-Squith” (based on the names of Suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst and Prime Minister Herbert Asquith). The goal of the race-style game was to reach the Houses of Parliament, the pinnacle of achievement for the campaign for Woman’s Suffrage. But first you had to get through the dark stuff. Like going to jail. And being force-fed. And laughed at. The game was sold in shops and could be ordered by mail. The proceeds went to the movement.

 

Board games were the social media of the time. Imagine daddy being forced to sit and play a game of “Pank-A-Squith” with his wife and two daughters. “Oh, poor Daddy! You’ve been thrown in jail for asking for your rights again!”

Next time you think your brand is too serious to make something fun or to engage in social media, remember Alice Paul and the Women’s Suffrage Movement. What would they do? Roll the dice. You might just win.

-Tom Christmann, Chief Creative Officer